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Russia is going to leave the International Space Station

Russia is going to leave the International Space Station

After 2024, Russia says it will leave the International Space Station (ISS) and establish its station. Since 1998, the US, Russia, and other countries have successfully collaborated on the ISS. As a result of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, however, the situation has deteriorated, and Russia had already threatened to abandon the project if Western sanctions were not lifted. Russia’s intention to leave the program has not yet been officially announced, according to Nasa. Since it was launched into orbit around Earth in 1998, the International Space Station (ISS), a cooperative venture of five space agencies, has been the site of hundreds of scientific investigations. It is authorized to run through 2024, but the US requests that it be extended for an additional six years with the consent of all partners.

In a meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Mr. Borisov declared that Roskosmos would honor its commitments to its partners, but that the company had decided to end the project in 2024. According to Mr. Borisov, the construction of a Russian orbital station will likely begin by this point and is his agency’s top priority. The decision’s implications for the ISS’s future are not yet apparent, and Nasa, the US space agency, claims that Russia has not given it any official notice of its intentions. Although the Russians have long made noises about leaving, it’s unclear how serious they are. The Russian Orbital Service Station, which they have discussed constructing, would cost money that the Russian government has not committed to the nation’s current space endeavors. 

Even if the Russian components on the ISS are getting older, engineers believe that the modules will still function well in 2030. Without a doubt, there would be an issue if Russia left. The partners are dependent on one another because of the way the station is built. The Russian side of the ISS provides the propulsion and prevents the platform from falling to Earth. The US side of the ISS provides the power. 

The US and its allies, Europe, Japan, and Canada, would have to come up with alternative ways to occasionally launch the station higher into the atmosphere if that propulsion capability were to be removed. American robotic freighters may carry it out. Space exploration has a long history in the Soviet Union and Russia, and successes like sending the first person into space in 1961 continue to be a source of pride for the countries. The new Russian space station will give Russia access to space-based services necessary for modern living, such as navigation and data transmission, according to Mr. Borisov, the chairman of Roskosmos, who met with Mr. Putin.

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